Turkey Update
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In my last post we saw our turkeys movin’ out to shelters on pasture from the brooder. However, turkeys quickly outgrow their shelters and must be moved to a new home once again. Their final destination (before the processing shed!) is a shaded gobbledygo surrounded by electric poultry netting. We make the gobbledygos with lumber milled here on the farm and the poultry netting is purchased from Premier 1.

There are approximately 350 hens in this group. We used three nets for their enclosure and they get moved to new grass every other day. Along with that, they have a continuous supply of turkey grit and feed. The turkeys will remain here until it’s time for butchering!.. which begins when they’re 16 weeks old.

Here are some pictures of the ladies from this past week!

breakfast time!

breakfast time!

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About Miriam Gust

Miriam grew up among the lakes of beautiful central Minnesota and is the youngest of four. She is devoted to serving her King Jesus, and she finds great joy in spending time outside (especially while farming and hunting!) and in simply sharing a cup of coffee with friends or family. She looks forward to continuing to learn and grow at Polyface and is eager to trust the Lord with whatever the future may hold.
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7 Responses to Turkey Update

  1. susan says:

    Do you feed medicated feed by chance. Or just regular feed.

    • Miriam Gust says:

      Hi Susan–

      No we do not feed medicated feed. All of feed is non-GMO and is purchased locally from Sunrise Farms. If the need arises, occasionally we’ll have garlic added to some of our feeds… but never medication or antibiotics.

      Thank you!

      • susan says:

        Thank you so much for replying! I’ve been struggling for awhile about medicated feed. Very difficult here in NYS to get non GMO feed. I appreciate all you guys do for pastured farming!

  2. Rose says:

    Beautiful! I have a question: why only hens? Do they taste better?

    • Miriam Gust says:

      Hi Rose–

      We have toms too! In all, Polyface is raising 900 toms and 800 hens this season. We just started raising hens and toms separately because we found that, overall, the birds do better and stay healthier throughout their lifetime… there’s more picking on each other that occurs with mixed groups. So, this one particular group of turkeys that I’m taking care of just happens to be hens 🙂

      Thanks for the great question!

      • Rose says:

        Aha! Well that makes sense! Are Turkeys easy to sex early on in life? I still have no idea how to tell with chickens until they get to crowing age, LOL. Thanks for sharing your brilliant trade secrets!! Love you guys and all you do!

        • Miriam Gust says:

          Hmmm that’s a good question! The hatchery we get the turkeys from already has them divided by sex when we receive them. So, I’m not exactly sure how they do it! But I would be interested in knowing too. Thank you for your encouragement and support, Rose 🙂